Archive for the ‘Travel to Brazil’ Category

Winter2013 everythingchanges

December 11, 2013

CHANGE continues to be the main theme in my life and career. In my October 3 blog entry, I shared about my wonderful new studio. Now, a couple of months later, everything has changed—again!

Just when I had gotten everything set up the way I liked it in the new studio, I got a call from the landlord. He had some bad news, he said. Plans had changed. No more artist’s studios—now they were going to rent out the entire space to a church. (A church??)

So I had 30 days to move out.

This was quite a surprise. But I was renting month-to-month, so I knew this kind of thing might happen. I just didn’t think it would happen so soon.

I was really unhappy—for about an hour. That’s how long it took me to find a positive approach and adapt to the situation. My original goal had been to get a studio in Parrish Studios, an old building in downtown Lincoln that is filled with artists and craftspeople and their studios and shops. I’d given up on that because they had no space. But just 2 days before my landlord called with the bad news, I’d gotten a voicemail from the guy at Parrish Studios telling me a space was opening up, and was I interested?

Well, I was now! I called him, it was still available, I went and saw the space the next day, and decided it would be just fine. Within one week of the call from my landlord, I had moved my studio into the new space.

It’s a bit smaller, but it’s still a very workable space. And the rent is less than half what I was paying in the previous place. And now I really am in the midst of a community of artists, which was what I wanted in the first place.

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Views of my new space at Parrish Studios in Lincoln, Nebraska. My rolling-workstation-with-homasote-panels system transferred nicely!

It was nice to discover that the setup I’d worked so hard to create in the first studio (with the homasote panels and the rolling workstation) was totally portable. Things were so well organized that by the second day in the new space, I was already painting and producing.

Which was a good thing, because I was now down to less than 3 weeks of painting time before leaving for Brazil!

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An added benefit to the new studio is the fact that the studio gets a lot of traffic each month on the First Friday Art Walk. Here I'm prepping for my first First Friday in Lincoln.

As the Nebraska air got colder, my eagerness for my approaching trip to South America grew. But I also found I was loving my new studio so much, I was hating the idea of leaving it. Not enough to change my plans, of course. But that’s the balance I’m trying to work out these days. I like having my studio in a place like Nebraska where it’s easy to focus on my work. But I need to have the stimulation of the tropics regularly as well.

I accomplished a lot in the days before leaving. Then, on November 12, I hopped on a plane and flew to Rio de Janeiro. As soon as I arrived I slipped into a different pace, a different way of life.

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Myself with some of the local talent at Ipanema Beach.

I’m writing this just a few days before my 5-week stay in Brazil ends. It’s been just what I needed. I do miss being able to paint, but it’s been good to focus on other things for awhile, like e-books, digital art, and writing.

It’s also good to be a social animal again. Nebraska is good for focusing on my art, but when I’m there I’m pretty solitary. In Brazil I stay in a hostel and I’m meeting tons of new people every day. I’m going to the beach, going out at night, hanging out with new friends, etc. The difference between my Nebraska life and this life is total. And I find I thrive on the difference.

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At Ipanema, learning a new sport from new Swedish friend Oliver: Slacklining.

I’ve now been in Rio for a month and it’s been wonderful—but I find I’m starting to wear out a bit from all the social stuff. I’m ready to head back to my studio for a few weeks of painting (and solitude) to recharge my batteries.

I’ll stay in Nebraska for Christmas, then just before New Year’s I head for Honolulu. It will be my first visit in over a year and a half—the longest I’ve been away from Hawaii since the early 1970s. I’ll stay there for a month, catching up with friends and seeing what it’s like to be back home after so long away. February and March remain unplanned.

So the process of reinventing my life continues. The hardest part is finding a way to travel as much as I want to, and still produce art consistently. I like being in the tropics a lot of the time, but I don’t like being away from my studio. Yet recreating a painting studio wherever I am is a logistical challenge that still seems too daunting. At the moment I’m just allowing things to unfold, and I know sooner or later the next phase will reveal itself. I don’t know what it will look like. I only know it’ll be perfect.

The Complete ON THE ROAD Blog Series (So Far)

Click on image to go to blog entry

Chapter 1, Early June 2011:
On Chucking It All and Going On the Road
Ontheroad1 chucking it all
Chapter 2, Mid-June 2011:
Prepping for the Road
Prepping for road blkborder
Chapter 3, Late June 2011:
Before I Take Off
Before i take off
Chapter 4, July 2011:
Letter from L.A.
Letter fm LA
Chapter 5, July 2011:
Malibu Photo Shoot with Steve Chen
Malibu w stevechen
Chapter 6, August 2011:
Letter from Lincoln
Lincoln w type
Chapter 7, September 2011:
Letter from Baltimore
Baltimore
Chapter 8, October 2011:
Letter from Honolulu
Honolulu hawaii beach
Chapter 9, November-December 2011:
Letter from Brazil
Letterfrombrazil
Chapter 10, February 2012:
Leaving Home…Going Home
Leavinghome goinghome
Chapter 11, July 2012:
Letter from Dakota Street
Ds instudio
Chapter 12, October 2012:
Letter from Banff
Letter from banff header
Chapter 13, November 2012:
Letter from Santo Domingo, Part 1:
Arrival in the Dominican Republic,
and Photo Shoot with Muscleboy Jeison
Header letter stodomingo 1
Chapter 14, November 2012:
Letter from Santo Domingo, Part 2:
Dominican Boys Gone Wild
Letter fm sto domingo part2 B
Chapter 15, November 2012:
Letter from Santo Domingo, Part 3:
Javier: The Boy Can’t Help It
Ltr fm sto domingo part3 B
Chapter 16, December 2012:
Letter from Santo Domingo, Part 4:
TROUBLE, and Getting Wet in Cabarete
Ltr fm sto domingo part4
Chapter 17, December 2013:
Winter 2013: Everything Changes

Winter2013 everythingchanges cropped
Chapter 18, February 2014:
On The Road: Walking The Tightrope

Walkingthetightrope header

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Click here to access all entries in Douglas Simonson’s “On the Road” Series


• GRATEFUL TO BE BROKE
• BRAZIL ARRIVAL AND COUCHSURFING FAIL
• THE HOSTEL EXPERIENCE
• DANIELA
• RIO AND PURA VIDA
• OLIVER AND THE ONE THAT GOT AWAY
• BYE-BYE BRAZIL



GRATEFUL TO BE BROKE

As you read in the first entry of this “On the Road” blog series, last summer I had a revelation in my kitchen and decided to go traveling for a year.

In that first entry, I talked about how imprisoned I was feeling by the fact that I now owned an apartment, and had to pay a big mortgage every month.

There’s more to the story.

When what is now being called the Global Financial Crisis hit in 2008, I had just bought my apartment AND rented an office, and my monthly expenses had more or less doubled. At almost the same time, or just shortly after, my business began to slow down. A LOT.

My expenses DOUBLED, and then BAM, my income dropped by HALF.

Whoa!

What that meant in practical terms was that suddenly my comfortable life became very UNcomfortable. It became more and more difficult to pay my bills. My income kept dropping, and my expenses stayed high.

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This is pretty much the same thing that happened to my business in mid-2008...

Over the next 2-1/2 years I tried many things to revitalize my art sales, and sometimes they seemed to work, but nothing worked for long. Sales continued to decline, and my financial condition continued to deteriorate. I sold everything I could sell, went deeper into debt, and still the slide continued. The result is, I’ve been going through some very trying times, and it’s been a challenge not to beat myself up for all this, and to maintain my optimism.

It would be easy to blame the global financial crisis for what’s been going on with my business, but what good would that do? And besides, I’ve come to believe that on a deeper level, something entirely different is going on.

My “On the Road” experiment has now been going on for nearly six months and I have to say, it’s one of the best decisions I’ve ever made. I love this life and its challenges and rewards. I’m growing, changing, getting stronger and more self-aware every day, in a way I simply wouldn’t have if I’d played it safe and stayed in Hawaii.

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It's scary and challenging and never boring. The first 6 months being On the Road have been phenomenal.

So when I look back at my decision from this vantage point, it’s pretty clear to me that if I hadn’t been going through such difficult times financially, if I hadn’t been feeling so up against the wall, I would never have made such a bold, outrageous decision.

The more clearly I see myself and my life (and I’m getting clearer fast out here on the tightrope), the more grateful I am for the trials and tribulations that kicked my ass out of my comfort zone!

At the same time, there are a lot of days when I just wish I had more money and I could pay all my debts right now. Because it’s one thing to be sitting in your apartment in Waikiki and feeling financial pressures. It’s another to be staying in a hostel in Brazil and not knowing how you’re going to pay for another week’s food and lodging! This is the kind of challenge I am now embracing in my life: seeing every trial as a gift.

There are no accidents. If my business had continued to grow and flourish, I wouldn’t now be on one of the greatest adventures of my life.

And the real adventure is not the travel or the daily challenges of living on the road. It’s discovering, over and over again, how powerful I am when I give up the need to control things or change them, and instead practice acceptance and gratitude.

And discovering that the more willing I am to have things stay exactly as they are, the faster they shift!



BRAZIL ARRIVAL AND COUCHSURFING FAIL

I flew to São Paulo on October 27.

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It was my first time in Brazil in 3 years and I was pretty happy to be back. My Hawaii friend David Moyer now lives in São Paulo and kindly offered me a place to stay while I was there. My plan was to stay in São Paulo for about a week, then take off and explore some Brazilian places I hadn’t seen before—and find one or more hot new models to photograph.

Things didn’t quite work out that way.

I belong to a website called couchsurfing.org, and prior to taking off on this trip, I was hosting couchsurfers from all over the world in my Waikiki apartment for several months. I didn’t do this get couchsurfer “cred”, I did it because I thoroughly enjoyed it. But when I did get the idea to go traveling for a year it occurred to me that I could experience the other side of the couchsurfing experience. I was planning to explore more of Brazil by going where the couches were, and letting that help define my travels. So I spent a lot of time on the computer while staying at Dave’s in São Paulo, trying to set up some couches to surf. I was particularly interested in going to Paraty, a beautiful little colonial beach town halfway between São Paulo and Rio.

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Scenes from my time in São Paulo

It was pretty frustrating. Either no response, or they would respond but they were traveling and couldn’t host, one thing after another. I realized that I should have started setting this up months before. I was in São Paulo for over 2 weeks before I realized I was going to have to find another solution.

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Couchsurfing.org is an awesome website and organization and I totally support it. However, it didn't work out so well for me when I was trying to find a place to stay in Paraty...

I was functioning on very little income, so hotels simply weren’t an option. But one of the couchsurfers who hadn’t been able to host me in Paraty had suggested something else: a hostel.

I don’t think I had ever actually stayed in a hostel. I’ve stayed in pousadas, and bed and breakfast places, but I had never shared a single dorm room with 8 or 10 strangers. But I looked at the prices, and I thought, Why not? I’m on an adventure anyway—and I need to get out of São Paulo and start the next phase of this trip! So I booked a $17-a-night dorm room bed in a hostel in Paraty, and spent $40 for the 4-hour bus ride.



THE HOSTEL EXPERIENCE

This turns out to be another gift my financial issues have given me. Staying at the MistiChill Hostel in Paraty was an awesome experience.

Side note here: I was painfully shy when I was younger, and it took me a lot of years and a lot of work to teach myself to be more courageous socially. But I have learned. And one of the things I’ve trained myself to do when faced with a stranger is to march right up to him or her, extend my hand and say “Hi! I’m Douglas.” I do this almost without thinking now. Well, actually, I do it TOTALLY without thinking, because if I thought about it I wouldn’t be able to do it.

I bring this up because this is the perfect approach to hostel life. I walked into the MistiChill Hostel and was immediately confronted with about 10 new people, all milling around the rather small common area. So I did what I do. I introduced myself and learned all their names (remembering names is another thing I’ve trained myself to do). Now I was everybody’s new friend, and when a group began forming to go out to dinner, I was automatically included. Awesome!

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New friends and a party every night when you're staying at a hostel!

(I can’t tell you how many times I’ve traveled alone and been in a hotel in a strange new city and wished I knew someone I could hang out with. Obviously this is not a problem in a hostel!)

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MistiChill Hostel in Paraty. Clockwise from upper left: Looking down from the 2nd floor; breakfast was served on the beach every morning; view from the front door of MistiChill; the common area of the hostel.

I must admit that sleeping in a small room with 7 other people and a tiny bathroom has its challenges. I did not always get a good night’s sleep. But somewhat to my surprise, I handled this all pretty well. One of my goals on this trip is to get more flexible, and I saw this as another opportunity. I did not see it as my right to have a good night’s sleep. Instead, I began to look at a good night’s sleep as a gift that one sometimes gets, and when it happens, you appreciate it profoundly. And when you don’t, it’s really not that big a deal. (But I was happy I had my headphones and my iPod.)

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Scenes of Paraty and nearby beach Trindade.

I spent over a week in Paraty, and I had a new group to hang out with every night, and I enjoyed every night! However, I was a bit frustrated that I was not finding models. I had hoped that the Paraty beach scene would be something like the Rio beach scene, with gorgeous boys running around in speedos. Nope. I had an awesome time in Paraty but I did not find a model, or even get close to it.

I wasn’t sure where I was going to head next, either. I didn’t want to go to Rio because I’ve been there so many times, I was feeling like I was over it. But along came Daniela.



DANIELA

One morning I woke up to a new girl in the room where I was staying. She was in the lower bunk opposite me. “Hi,” she said, “I’m Daniela.”

Daniela is a tall, pretty girl born and raised in Rio de Janeiro who looked like she was from Germany or Holland. Her heritage was German and Italian, so that’s why. But she’s totally Brazilian, with all the expressiveness and extreme social energy that goes with that. As soon as I met her, my new-crowd-every-night thing stopped because we were instant best friends. I started hanging out with her and another girl I really liked a lot, Luciana, who was visiting from São Paulo.

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Daniela and Luciana.

They were a lot of fun, and Daniela solved my problem of where I should go next. “I’m going back to Rio day after tomorrow,” she said. “Why don’t you come with me? I know a great hostel right near where I live in Copacabana and I’ll call them and put in a good word for you.”

I’d been waiting for a sign from the universe and here it was. So two days later Daniela and I took the 4-hour bus ride from Paraty to Rio, and she took me to the hostel she had lined up for me, the Pura Vida Hostel in Copacabana.



RIO AND PURA VIDA

My first impression of the Pura Vida hostel was, Oh my god. It’s beautiful.

It’s up on a hill on a side street in Copacabana and it looks like a castle. I found out later it used to be the Polish Embassy in the 1920’s, back when Rio was still Brazil’s capital. And now it’s a hostel. Like the MistiChill, there was a constant parade of new people and my meeting-people skills were pressed into action once again.

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The Pura Vida Hostel in Rio de Janeiro.

I hadn’t been sure I even wanted to go to Rio, but once I was there, something wonderful and unexpected happened: I fell in love with Rio all over again. It was like running into an old boyfriend after many years and finding out that you’ve both grown and changed, but the old magic is still there, and it’s better now because you’re more relaxed with each other. I felt comfortable and at home in Rio. Yet that teasing flavor of the exotic was still there.

(Plus, and I don’t know why it is, but the men are definitely hotter in Rio. Lots of model material!)

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But I went through some major challenges while in Rio. I was keeping in touch with my assistant via e-mail and Skype, and together we decided what bills we could pay and what we would have to put off. It was a never-ending juggling act. I made a mistake at this point, and I’ve done this before: I put paying bills ahead of my personal well-being. The result of this was, after 3 or 4 days in Rio, I found my pockets empty, and I couldn’t even go to the beach and rent a beach chair and umbrella.

I got pretty depressed at this point.

I went through a couple of pretty difficult days, and I realized something: if I don’t take care of myself first, I won’t be able to pay my bills anyway. I have to take care of myself or I can’t write or create art. Pretty basic, but I hadn’t gotten this yet. This was a good realization. So I stopped doing that.

It meant putting off another couple of bills, and that was uncomfortable, but I had to do it. Once again I was able to go to the beach, which was important, because that was one of the main places where I could scout for models.



OLIVER AND THE ONE THAT GOT AWAY

One day on the gay beach in Ipanema I met a boy named Oliver, a tall, skinny black boy with a big afro and a bigger personality.

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Ipanema, looking toward the gay beach.

Oliver is a model and actor, and social butterfly, and very funny and entertaining. He and his friends were a lot of fun and I was really enjoying hanging out with them and trying to understand their rapid-fire Portuguese.

When the sun drops behind Pedra da Gávea, it’s time to head down Farme de Amoedo for after-beach drinks and socializing. So I joined Oliver and his friends and off we went to a place called Tô Nem Ai. This is a sidewalk bar-café where everybody goes after the beach. (Tô Nem Ai is a Brazilian Portuguese expression which basically means “I don’t give a shit” or “Who cares?”)

We had already been drinking at the beach, and we drank more at Tô Nem Ai. I was having a great time. At some point in the evening, and I don’t remember exactly when or how this happened, Oliver and I began kissing. I do remember exactly how his lips felt. This boy was an amazing kisser. Oh my god. I also found out he was 19 years old. Less than one-third my age. Guess what. Tô nem ai.

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Fun with Oliver and friends.

One of Oliver’s friends was named Eder. Eder was model material. I didn’t approach him that night for two reasons: 1, I was busy kissing Oliver. 2, I didn’t want to offer him a modeling job when I was drunk and then find out later that he wasn’t all that hot after all. So I held back.

The next day at the beach, I saw Eder again when I wasn’t drunk, and then I knew. Yes, he’s hot. I started talking to him about modeling.

Eder was one of those people who, when you’re talking to him, seldom looks at you. He was busy looking around at everyone else. This was not a good sign, but I chose to ignore it. He was beautiful and he had a great body, and my time in Brazil was growing short. I needed a model! (I did not have the money to pay him, but I decided to just trust that it would be there when I needed it.)

Eder and I made arrangements to email each other that evening and firm up arrangements for him to come to the hostel the next day where he and I could go over the model agreement and the arrangements for the photo shoot itself.

I emailed him that night. The next day I began checking early for his return email.

It never arrived.

The next day, I went to the beach and Oliver was there, with Eder, and they came up to me and Eder said immediately, “I never got your email.” I told him I’d sent it. At this point it started to become clear to me that this was not going to work out, because rather than engaging me about this and going ahead and planning a photo shoot anyway, Eder simply shrugged and walked away.

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Eder and Oliver.

After many years of dancing the dance with potential models, I recognize the danger signs early. When you’re trying to put together a photo shoot with someone, things usually go one way or the other. Either things flow and fall into place nicely—or they don’t. And when they don’t, it’s a clear sign that nothing is going to be easy here, and it’s best to move on.

It was obvious things weren’t going to flow with Eder, and it was time to move on.

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The weather in Rio was sucking.

Unfortunately I only had a few more days in Rio, and to make matters worse, the weather was sucking. 3 out of every 4 days were rainy and/or cold and cloudy. I began to resign myself to the fact that I was going to have spent 6 weeks in Brazil and not found a model.

I began to think back on all the guys I’d seen on the street in Rio who were hot and might have made great models. I began to beat myself up for not chasing them down the street and stopping them and talking to them and giving them my card. Then I stopped myself. How long is it going to take before I learn to give myself a break and trust the way things are unfolding? If I’d been meant to find a model during this Brazil stay, it would have happened. It’s not the end of the world that I didn’t find one. It will happen when it happens. I’ve been through this before, and a great new model always surfaces. If I’ve learned anything by now, it’s that you can’t control this kind of thing. So I let go and gave myself a break.



BYE-BYE BRAZIL

I spent my final days in Rio just enjoying the place and allowing things to flow the way they flowed.

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On the bus with Adriano.

My final evening in Rio I spent with a friend from Hawaii in Ipanema, and we visited a sauna called G Spa filled with beautiful men (too bad it was my last night or I might’ve found a model!). I did find a new friend, Adriano, and he helped make my final evening in Rio memorable.

The next day I took the 6-hour bus ride to São Paulo where I hung out for a day at Dave Moyer’s, then went to the airport at Guarulhos to catch a midnight flight to Dallas.

I’m now staying at the home of my Hawaii friends Bud and James, who now live in Austin, Texas. I’m catching up on writing and drawing (hard to find space for that kind of thing in a hostel!). Missing Brazil already, but glad to be back in the U.S. too. What a joy to have my own room and bathroom with hot water—and real toilet paper! I am appreciating the little things like never before.

Next, Christmas with the family in Nebraska, and then back to Hawaii in early January. Eager to get back to my studio and do some painting before taking off on the next phase of the adventure.

And who knows? I may find a model in Texas. Or Nebraska. Anything could happen.


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Click here to access all entries in Douglas Simonson’s “On the Road” Series

letter-fm-honolulu.jpg

Click here to access all entries in Douglas Simonson’s “On the Road” Series


October 25, 2011

When I decided to go traveling for a year I really thought that I could travel for like two and half to three months at a shot, then come back to Hawaii for a week or 10 days, just catch up on stuff, and then take off for another two and half to three months.

Nice plan!

But totally out of touch with reality.

I have now realized, after my first quick Hawaii check-in has turned into a five-week stay, during which I have worked 12 to 14 hour days most of the time, that it’s not that simple.

I forgot that I would have 3 months of stuff to catch up on every time I come home!

Also, when I returned to Hawaii on September 15 after 2+ months of traveling, my apartment in Waikiki still hadn’t been rented. This was puzzling to me. It’s a great apartment, great location, and the property management people seemed to be doing a good job of showing it.

It was frustrating because I’d been counting on that rental income. On the other hand, it
was nice to have a place to stay while back in Hawaii.

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At Hula's with Steph.

Then, about a week after my return, I went out for a drink with my friend Steph (read about Steph and our 2008 Brazil travels together here). I told her I still hadn’t rented my apartment and she got excited. She and her friend Brian had been looking for a place in Waikiki…you can figure out the rest!

(Now I understood why the apartment hadn’t rented for 3 months…it was waiting for Steph!)

That was the perfect solution to one problem, but it created another. They wanted to move in immediately, which meant I no longer had a place to stay, and no immediate prospects for one.

But y’know, I wasn’t worried. One thing about my new lifestyle: it’s making me a lot more comfortable with uncertainty. My first 9 weeks on the road, traveling across North America and back again, was like the path of a tropical storm: unpredictable, erratic, and totally dependent on the winds, temperature and currents for direction and destination.

I’d been kind of apprehensive when I started my long-term traveling, with a make-it-up-as-you-go approach. I wasn’t sure I really had the balls to live this way!

Turns out I do. In fact, so far I’m loving it. One of the best, and least-expected, benefits of living this way, being open to circumstance and trusting rather than knowing what’s coming next, is that wonderful, unexpected things keep coming my way.

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With my friends Richard and Michele in Los Angeles

In LA, standing in line at Whole Foods in Brentwood, I looked behind me to see my publisher friend Richard, an old friend from Hawaii. I’d been trying to reconnect with him online for the past year or so. I got a chance to meet him and his wife Michele, who is lovely and already a friend, for lunch and catching up.

In Lincoln, Nebraska, where I hardly expected it, I met a woman who, like me, is just beginning to discover her abilities as an energy worker and healer. I spent a whole day with Bonnie and we not only did healing work on each other, we both learned a lot.

In New Orleans, I got on the shuttle for the airport in the rainy pitch-black of 3:20 a.m. and met Kath, a beautiful woman from Australia who is a seeker in many of the same ways as I am. She was on her way to an adventure in Cuba. We talked all the way to the airport, then found ourselves on the same flight, in seats next to each other, and again, talked all the way to Miami. We parted with a big hug and we’re now in touch via Facebook.

In LA, I reconnected with an old boyfriend who is now a dear friend, and has been a flight attendant for the past 20 years. When he heard about my new traveling lifestyle, he set me up with a buddy pass on his airline.

A friend I’ve known since my early days in Hawaii happened to be in LA when I was and saw me on Facebook and invited me to lunch. It was a wonderful reconnection and great to see him. When we said goodbye, he gave me an envelope and said, Open this later. When I got home, I opened it, and out fell $1400 in 100-dollar bills. It turns out that 30 years ago in Hawaii, I had loaned him $500 to buy a motorcycle. I’d forgotten long ago, but he not only remembered, he repaid me plus 30 years of interest.

I almost fell over when I opened that envelope, because I’d been wondering how I would manage, moneywise, over the next couple of months.

It seems the more uncertain my life is, the more space there is for unexpected blessings. I thought it would be a challenge to live this way, and certainly at times it is, but mostly I just feel blessed, and I love the way I’m learning to trust.

So I wasn’t worried about finding a place to stay even though it was Sunday night and my new tenants were moving in on Monday and I did not want to be the landlord crashing on the living-room floor! So I decided I would go out that evening, and just trust that things would fall into place.

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At Honolulu's La Mariana Restaurant with friends Allen and Joe a few days before leaving for Brazil. Allen is the angel who gave me a place to stay while in Honolulu

Within a half-hour of my arriving at the bar, I ran into a friend of mine named Allen, who happened to have an empty house that needed housesitting…for 3 weeks, which was just the amount of time I would be on the island. He even had a car I could use.

Believe me when I say this was not the type of thing that used to happen to me when I was living a safe, conservative life, staying in one place and playing it relatively safe.

I spent the next 3 weeks in Honolulu drawing, painting, writing, and doing the million things required of me before taking off again. And today, as I write this from seat 13A on American Airlines flight 162 from Honolulu to LA, I feel ready for the next phase of the adventure.

(Another unexpected plus just now: one of the flight attendants is an old friend, and he’s been sending me free beer and anything else I want.)

ADDENDUM:

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Kurt and Jacob in rainy L.A.

I’m now in the airport waiting for my flight to Dallas where I connect to my flight for São Paulo. I’ve just spent a wonderful couple of days in LA with my friend Kurt Brown. Kurt and I got a chance to work together on his first e-book (watch for that on my site!) It was great spending time with Kurt and his roommate Jacob, despite the rainy weather while I was there.

So I’m about to get on the plane now. I just checked my e-mail and I see that my friend Dave, who’ll be my host in São Paulo, is throwing a party for me day after tomorrow. Can’t wait!

(Be watching for upcoming Letters from Brazil!)

I’ve just returned from Brazil, the first trip I’ve taken there since early last year when I found and photographed Wellington and Israel in Salvador. This time I traveled with my good friend Steph, and I must say we made a great team. She’s a bit like Gina in that she’s beautiful and fun and attracts lots of attention! We stopped over in Miami for a couple of days, then flew to Rio.

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Steph and myself in Miami at the Palace Bar, before catching an evening flight to Rio.


This was Steph’s first time in Brazil so we saw the sights of Rio for a couple of days before heading by bus to Búzios (a 3-1/2 hour ride). I’d never been to Búzios but had heard lots about it. It turned out to be a beautiful, sophisticated yet rustic little town, and we stayed in a charming, simple-but-beautiful room in a pousada called Passeio das Palmeiras (I recommend it, and the proprietor, Lucas, is pretty charming and beautiful himself).

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The morning lifeguard workout in the streets of Búzios---another good reason to visit this little beach town


Our original plan had been to rent a car and drive up the coast from Rio to Salvador, but for various reasons that didn’t work out. Traveling by bus up the coast began to look like a long, hard trek as well—so we wound up going back to Rio by bus so we could fly up to Salvador. From Salvador we would go back south, again by bus, to Itacaré, a place we both wanted to explore.


During our one-night stay in Salvador, I took Steph to one of my favorite restaurants, Caranguejo, and introduced her to Moqueca de Camarão, which is a Bahian seafood bouillabaisse made with coconut milk and dende and shrimp and god knows what else, and is a little bit of heaven. It required just one spoonful to convert Steph. (May I also mention here that, as an inveterate beer drinker, one of the things I love about Brazil is that they are religious about only serving really REALLY cold beer. I love that!)

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Steph's first Moqueca de Camarão in Salvador


We didn’t really know what we were in for when we got on the bus from Salvador to Itacaré. Well, actually, you can’t get a bus from Salvador to Itacaré. You have to get a bus for Itabuna or Ilhéus, and then catch ANOTHER bus to Itacaré. So we blithely got on the bus (which I must admit was very comfortable) and settled in for a six-hour journey. Actually it might have been seven—the time zone kept changing and nobody told us, which meant we kept thinking we were either way ahead of schedule or we were about to miss our next bus, which didn’t add to our peace of mind. Anyway, after six or seven hours on the nice bus, we then had to spend two and a half more hours on the not-so-nice bus, and by then it was late at night, so by the time we rolled into Itacaré, we were pretty exhausted.

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Views from the bus ride, Salvador-Itabuna


But the next morning when we got up and saw in the full light of day where we’d landed, we were happy. Itacaré is a very cool little hippie-surfer town, with great beaches, great waves, and a lot of charm and atmosphere. we stayed in a pousada called Hanalei (yes, like the beach on Kauai) which was like a Swiss-Family-Robinson treehouse, only not in a tree. Charming and well-managed—and the breakfast itself was worth the price of admission. GREAT food! Another pousada I can heartily recommend, if you ever want to make the trek to Itacaré.

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Some views of Itacaré's scenery


—Which you might want to do, because this is one of those places everybody falls in love with. It’s friendly and rustic and has lots of cool places to hang out—and beautiful, with 7 or 8 or 10 beaches, I don’t know how many, all close together and all gorgeous. Some gorgeous people too. We met quite a few of them, and on our second day there, we met a boy named Baiano. I had not been planning to work on this trip, but when I met this boy, I changed my mind. Here was a raw sexiness I felt I had to capture! Everything fell into place very quickly. I met him around noon, and by 3pm we had hiked to a deserted hilltop overlooking a beautiful beach, where Baiano got naked and I made him climb up and down the trails for the next 2 hours.

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Left: Baiano with surfboard. Right: Following Baiano up the hill on the way to our photo session.


Just as exciting as the model was the setting. This is the kind of backdrop I just can’t find in Hawaii, because it’s so populated. Itacaré is a small town in the middle of nowhere with a surplus of beaches, so you can shoot a nude model in places like this without worrying about lots of people wandering through your photo shoot. Like most of my models, Baiano is a sexy boy with charm, charisma and an oversupply of testosterone. It’s a combination that works for me. As is usually the case, Baiano was a bit surprised at how much fun it was to model for me, and at the conclusion of the shoot, we were good buddies.

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Some shots of Baiano in Itacaré


Steph and I left Itacaré with some reluctance, but it was time to go home. This time we skipped the bus and flew from Ilhéus to Salvador (45 minutes instead of 9 hours). We spent one last day in Salvador, most of it on the beach in Barra, where we ran into Wellington, my model from last year. We took him out for dinner and drinks that night, then went home because we had to get up early for our flight home.
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Wellington and Steph on our last day in Bahia


What a wonderful trip, but so great to be home again. I hated to leave Brazil but was overjoyed to get back because I’d been missing painting so much. I’m now happily ensconced in my studio painting and drawing like mad!

The beach shoot in the previous entry happened on a Thursday. Saturday was the day we’d scheduled a boat excursion to some of the islands in the bay (Bahia de Todos os Santos). Renting a boat is always an interesting process in Brazil (maybe it is everywhere, i don’t know—I’ve only done it in Brazil). So all of us arrived at the beach in Barra, which is where we were supposed to meet the boat, and we were loaded down with supplies (beer and soft drinks, sandwich fixings, and ICE) for the day trip, and—NO BOAT!

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Waiting for them to bring the boat around...

The dreadlocked guy I’d been dealing with, who calls himself "Marco Polo", told me that the R$500 (500 reais, about $250) boat I’d hired and given him a deposit on was not available—it was being repaired "out on the island"—and sorry, but all we have available is the BIG boat for 900 reais ($450). Is that okay? We were already there, ready to go, the ice was melting—I felt like I didn’t have much choice but to give in to the manipulation. But I was pretty philosophical about the extra expense—my attitude in these situations is, everything happens for a reason. And when we finally got on the boat I saw that it was exactly what I’d had in mind and if we’d taken the less-expensive boat I might well have been disappointed.

(Nevertheless, NOTE TO SELF: If you’re going to rent a boat and sail to deserted islands, Angra dos Reis is a much better choice. Lots more boats to choose from—and more competitive prices—and lots more islands to choose from too!)

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Leaving Salvador...hijinks enroute...quiet moment with Israel and Fernando.

We loaded our stuff and ourselves onto the boat and sailed out into the Bay to a place called Ilha de Frades, one of many small (and some not-so-small) islands in the Bahia de Todos os Santos (All Saints’ Bay) which is the bay on which Salvador is located. It took us nearly 2 hours to reach the island (and this was sailing across just one corner of the bay—it’s one of the biggest in the world). Once there, we found another beautiful, deserted beach—beautiful in a very different way from the one we’d visited two days before. This was more like the beaches in the islands of Angra dos Reis, though with more coconut palms, which add a visual element I always like.

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Wellington bringing gear to shore; Kelly and Israel; the boys on the beach; playing by the tidepool.

There was no dinghy or rowboat, which meant that once the schooner was anchored, we had to ferry my camera equipment to shore in plastic bags held atop the heads of the models. Remind me to get a boat with a rowboat next time!

Anyway, once we had all our stuff over on the beach, I began following the boys around with my camera (always a challenge to keep up with them!), shooting nonstop, and my sister Kelly following us with the video camera—also doing her best to keep up.

Things went very well and then we reached an area where the rocks were very slippery, and as I’m shooting the guys playing in a tidepool, I hear a yell and turn to see that Kelly’s feet have gone out from under her and she’s sitting in a tidepool—she’s soaked, and so is the video camera. Almost instantly Wellington ran over to ‘save’ her (he’s very gallant around Kelly) and he also slipped, fell, and slid right into the same tidepool. Fortunately all Kelly had was a scraped elbow—but the video camera was no longer working, and as it turned out, was pretty much trashed—not only had salt water had gotten into the circuits, the impact itself broke a key component (we found this out later). Kelly, as you can imagine, felt terrible—but I reassured her that it was nobody’s fault and shit happens! And anyway, it’s just a piece of equipment—it can be replaced.

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Heading home after a long day in the sun...

As philosophical as I was about the loss of the equipment, it was still a blow for me—I’d been really enjoying the process of videotaping this whole trip (and already editing the movie in my mind), and suddenly it seemed like that part of the project was going to be fatally compromised. I soon realized i was overreacting, and there’s always a way to deal with it—but it took me a bit to get to that point.

Anyway, I kept shooting the models even though i was feeling preoccupied and upset. As I shot the photos, I was thinking, well, these aren’t going to be much good because I’m not focused like I should be. But the next day, when I looked at the results on the computer, I was blown away by how good they were. I guess I’m more professional than I realized. Not a bad thing to discover.

So the second model shoot, despite the loss of the video camera, turned to be a good, productive day. We sailed back to Salvador, got off the boat and waded to shore with all our stuff, and I headed straight home and fell into bed, out like a light.

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Wellington became our new best friend in Salvador.

Once the second photo shoot was over, I could finally relax and enjoy being in Salvador. But I was so tired I found myself mostly just catching up on sleep. I did enjoy myself, though. Salvador is a great place, and the people we met made it even better. Over the next few days, Wellington kind of adopted Kelly and me, and took us everywhere. He’s the kind of guy who, wherever he goes, finds friends. Either you already know him and like him, or you’re about to. This meant that we got incredible warmth (and great service too!) from people wherever we went with him. He made the rest of our stay in Salvador even better than it would’ve been otherwise.

I also have to thank Fernando for providing so much help and guidance, and generally doing a great job as a talent-scout-agent-tour-guide and general helper. Again, his website is bahiaboybrasil.com, if you’re headed for Salvador and you need somebody to take care of you and show you around.

Kelly and I spent three days in Rio before heading home to, respectively, Hawaii and Lincoln, Nebraska. I enjoyed showing her around one of my favorite towns and we met a lot of nice people there too. I got back to Honolulu on Saturday, April 14, and as great a time as I had in Brazil this trip, it was wonderful to be home! I can hardly wait to start work on new paintings and drawings of Israel and Wellington. (And planning my next trip…?)

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Almost there...


We rented a van and a driver for the day, and met at the “beach house” (we were no longer calling it the house from hell, since we didn’t have to live there).


I was amazed that both Wellington and Israel were not only on time, but EARLY! I have to say again, you just don’t get this kind of thing in Salvador. I was counting my blessings!


It was Fernando, my agent and assistant, who was more typically Bahian. He kept us all waiting almost a half-hour. Still, we were all in the van and on our way by 10:30 AM, which was earlier than I’d hoped.


That was good, because it was a long drive to where we were going—2 and a half hours, in fact. The first 2 hours were by main highway, but the last half hour was down country backroads that sometimes looked almost impassable. But we got there!

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The beach was perfect!

We unloaded ourselves and our stuff from the van and trudged up a sand dune to see what the beach looked like on the other side. It was beautiful! In fact, it was exactly what I had had in mind when I was first planning this trip. We had to walk down the beach a ways to get away from a few fishermen but we soon reached a perfect spot—deserted, windswept, coconut palms in the background. We got set up and the boys started getting undressed.

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Israel heading into the surf.

Wellington went for a quick run down the beach. He needed to clear his head before he started modeling, he said. Israel didn’t need any preparation. He headed for the water, still in his white undershorts. I looked away for a second, then looked back and he was heading into the surf, already naked.

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Wellington and Israel: a good team.

If the location was great, the models were even better. As you know if you’ve read previous Brazil entries of this Diary, I love the energy and inventiveness Marcus brings to my model shoots with him. Well, that was just the type of thing i got immediately from Wellington and Israel. Wellington was acting almost like an older brother to Israel (Wellington is a confident, grown-up 25, Israel a not-very-mature 21), helping, encouraging, and teasing him. The two hadn’t met before they met through me, but they had a great chemistry together. Both are straight (though “straight-flexible” might be a better term in Brazil), but they were willing to be somewhat physically affectionate with each other in a really masculine, sexy way. As with Marcus, they didn’t need much direction—my main challenge was just to keep up with them.

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Israel enjoying himself; models harassing Kelly

An interesting thing happened: Wellington came up to me early in the shoot, all wet from playing in the surf with Israel, and said in Portuguese something to the effect of, "What happens if we get excited (sexually aroused)?" I laughed and said, Believe me, it’s not a problem. He said, Really? I said, REALLY. From then on, both of the guys were constantly stroking themselves. This is something Brazilian boys do a lot of anyway, but they really went for it—especially Israel. in fact, at one point i was trying to get them to play ball in the surf again, but Israel just wanted to stand around stroking his "pica dura." It was very sexy—and kind of funny, too. As my sister Kelly said after having her picture taken with Wellington and Israel standing next to her naked and aroused, "I know how this would probably look to somebody who wasn’t here, but I’m kind of amazed at how innocent it all is." And it was. In fact, there was a kind of freshness and magic to the whole experience that day that made it one of the best photo session experiences i’ve ever had.

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One of the 1700-plus images shot that day---a very successful photo session!

And later, looking at the photographs on my computer, i saw that a lot of the magic had been captured in the images. There are some fantastic painting possibilities in these photographs. I’m definitely going to be stretching myself as a painter to do justice to some of these images. I’m looking forward to the challenge!