Archive for the ‘2009’ Category

There’s this photograph of Wellington and Israel at Massarandupió Beach in Bahia that I love. It really captures one of the many great moments that day. The composition, the lighting, the feeling of the image….I think they’re all wonderful, and I thought it would make a terrific painting. But for a long time I was afraid to tackle it. I was afraid I wouldn’t be able to capture the light and the feeling of the image. But finally I decided, okay, maybe I’m ready now. I’ll give it a shot!

2477bahianbchboys-source.jpg

This is the photo I started with.


I started by tweaking the image in Photoshop. There are two major differences I make in the image this way. One, I intensify (via saturation and light/dark) the colors, which makes the image more vibrant. In this way I have a guide for mixing colors. It’s possible to mix vibrant colors even though you’re working from a less-than-vibrant photographic image, but it’s a lot more difficult. I like to let the computer do this for me. And in the final analysis, I don’t have to follow the color guide in the photo exactly…it’s just a guide. The second thing I do when tweaking the image is blur it. But I don’t use the Blur function in Photoshop, I use something called Median (Filters -> Noise -> Median). This removes the detail in a more elegant way than just blurring the image. And that’s what I want—to remove the detail. This forces me to look at the major shapes and areas of color and light and dark when working on the painting. I could do that by just squinting at the source image while working, but it’s nice not to have to do that. And of course I keep the undoctored image around in case I want to add in some detail (but not until much later!). Oh, yeah—I often use Posterize on the image after Median. This lessens the number of colors used so it’s easier to see color areas.

2477bahianbchboys-source2.jpg

This is the photograph after some tweaking in Photoshop.


My next step was to do a color study. This is a small, rough version of the final painting in which I can work out problems of color, tonal balance (balance of lights and darks), composition and whatever else I might not expect but which will probably crop up in the color study. The color study went pretty well but I found I had difficulties with the tone of the hill behind the figures. I kept getting it too light or too dark. Also it was a tricky mix of greens and purples. I kept remixing the colors until I got it more or less correct. When I had everything looking pretty balanced, I decided I was ready to tackle the big picture.

The acrylic sketch I did as preparation for the painting (click on image to see this item on my website)

The acrylic sketch I did as preparation for the painting (click on image to see this item on my website)

The biggest challenge in doing a big finished work, as opposed to a rough sketch, is psychological/emotional. It’s hard not to take the larger work more seriously and care more that it works out. Caring too much about the success of a painting is practically a guarantee of its failure. The difficulty is finding a balance between working toward a vision of the finished work, but not gripping that vision too tightly, so you can stay loose and allow the energy to flow. With this painting I was on both sides of that line, but walked it most of the time. Which worked out pretty well. I needed all the preparatory work I’d done because this painting was a challenge in many ways—but all the work paid off and I managed to keep it loose and fairly spontaneous and still capture the feeling and the light of the original scene. I’m pretty happy with this one. I’m calling it Bahian Beach Boys.

The final painting (click on image to see this item on my website)

The final painting (click on image to see this item on my website)

For this painting I went back to one of my most consistent themes/fantasies: the naked brown-skinned boy in the jungle. I still have lots of Baiano photos I haven’t used, and I found a nice one for this, where he’s leaning against a tree on a hillside near Itacaré (see my Dec. 1 2008 diary entry for more on that photo shoot).

coastaljungle-sourcefoto.jpg 1090717.jpg
New model Baiano on a jungle-y hillside in Itacaré The rough sketch that inspired me to do a finished painting. Click on image to see this item on my website.

This painting actually began the way many of my paintings begin—with a sketch that I really liked. Many times I’ll start with a photograph I really like and then none of the sketches that come from it really excite me. When that happens I usually just move onto another image until I get a sketch that DOES excite me. But with this one, it happened right away. I like the feeling of the sketch and I’m determined to keep the painting loose and not get too careful and overwork it.

coastaljungle-inprog1.jpg coastaljungle-inprog2.jpg
This is the underdrawing on the canvas before the painting begins. Here, the first thin washes of color have been applied.

Next I transferred the sketch to canvas. I did this the easy way—I scanned the sketch, then used my digital projector to project it onto the canvas so I could do it exactly the size I wanted, and retain as much of the feeling of the sketch as possible. You’ll notice I also went into a bit more detail with the plant life.

Next I did the ground, which is the underpainting. I used to use a single color for this—and that does work fine—but lately I’ve been doing one color for the body, one or two colors for the background. That seems to work pretty well for me too. Once the ground had dried, I outlined the forms with dark paint. I used to always use black paint for this, but lately I’ve begun doing colors. In this case I used a really dark warm brown for the body outlines, a really dark green for the foliage outlines, and a dark cool brown for the tree outlines. It’s more work, but it’s subtly different from the black outlines and I like the final effect better.

coastaljungle-inprog3.jpg coastaljungle-inprog4.jpg
Here I begin actually applying the paint. About 60% done.

While that was drying, I mixed my colors for the actual painting. This is usually a pretty time-consuming part of the process—sometimes I’ll spend up to an hour mixing the colors. I think I overdo/overthink this process sometimes though, and I find lately I’m getting better at keeping the mixtures simpler. Which of course is always a good idea. Not only does it save time, the art tends to be better when it’s more spontaneous and LESS complicated instead of more!

The final painting (click on image to see this item on my website)

The final painting (click on image to see this item on my website)

I spent a couple of days on this one and it worked out pretty well. Working all over the painting made it possible to get a color scheme going without too many false moves. I’m also pleased that I didn’t get too careful; I kept the whole painting pretty loose and it has a nice consistency of tone, I think. I’m calling it “Coastal Jungle.”

1407source-2upI was browsing through my thousands of digital photos on my computer, looking for ideas for my next painting, and I found myself in the Marcus April 2006 folder. This was the trip I took to Rio and rented my friends’ Copacabana apartment, and had a photo shoot set up with Marcus and he never showed up–then he showed up two days later at 9 in the morning and I had to drag myself out of bed and collect myself in a hurry to do a 2-hour photo shoot. Marcus is one of the few models I would do that for! This photograph has him in my bedroom on the bed I was sleeping in, sprawled out invitingly. Unfortunately the photograph I liked best was cut off on the left. I wanted a more horizontal composition, so I took another photograph I took at about the same time, and added more leg and bed on the left. Thank goodness for Photoshop!

Extending the composition horizontally and adding a window.

Extending the composition horizontally and adding a window.

Once I had the two photographs put together and had a composition I liked, I wanted to change the mood of the image. The simple bedroom setting was not very exciting to me. I wanted more of a fantasy. I had the idea of adding a window that looked out on a tropical beach setting. So I went looking on the Internet for windows with palm trees showing through them. That was not easy, but I finally found something that was more or less what I was looking for. Using Photoshop, I plopped that window into the upper right corner to see what it looked/felt like. I liked the result and thought, yes, I think this concept is going to work.

First pencil sketch that was getting close to what I wanted.

First pencil sketch that was getting close to what I wanted. (Click on image to go to my art website.)

Using my doctored photographic image, I began sketching. After about 7 or 8 rough sketches, I finally started to get an image that excited me. This required some stylization and simplification, some elongation of the figure, and a “cottage” feeling–which means vertical lines suggesting a simple wood structure, and a window framing palms and an ocean horizon.

Final pencil sketch before I began figuring out color scheme.

Final pencil sketch before I began figuring out color scheme. (Click on image to go to my art website.)

The following drawing was very close to what I wanted. The elements all seemed to be in place. What I needed now was a color scheme. The existing colors of the photographic image were close, but a little boring. I decided that, rather than doing several color studies, I would continue working in Photoshop. That way, when a color area didn’t work, I could easily change the color, or lighten or darken it to see if it helped. This is much easier than repainting a whole area, or starting a new color sketch, until I get the color balance I want.

Layered photoshop image which allowed me to experiment with colors.

Layered photoshop image which allowed me to experiment with colors.

Using Photoshop I was able to cut out the figure from one of the source photographs, elongate and distort it so it fit the drawing I’d created, then “paint” in the color areas on the computer to see how the color scheme was working. This saved me a lot of time, and I was able to fairly quickly find a combination of colors that fit with the fantasy that was taking shape in my mind: colors that gave me the feeling of a lazy afternoon in a tropical beach cottage with a boy I’d met in the city and brought to a little beach town for a romantic weekend together.

The final painting: "Beach Cottage"

The final painting: "Beach Cottage." (Click on image to see the print on my website.)

That ended the preparatory phase of the work, and set the stage for the real work: creating the actual painting. I had worked out the color scheme and had a nice approximation of the feeling I was going for, and that made creating the painting itself much easier. There followed 3 days of taking the rough concept and turning it into a finished painting. I kept the finished work pretty faithful to the final sketch, except for going back to the previous sketch to get the plate and discarded cup on the floor–I thought that was a nice touch, suggesting the relaxed nature of the “lost weekend” I was depicting. I decided to call the painting “Beach Cottage.” I’m very happy with this painting, not least because I took a semi-interesting photographic image and turned it into a much richer painting with a whole story behind it.

This is the rough sketch of Nohea that I liked enough to develop further.

This is the rough sketch of Nohea that I liked enough to develop further.

My latest painting began as a sketch that I particularly liked. This is often how it happens. I was sketching from some shots from my photo session with Nohea and one of the sketches turned out so well I thought, maybe this could be a painting.

Actually I made some changes to the photo before I even began drawing from it. In the photograph Nohea is just letting his hands hang at his sides. It wasn’t very interesting, so I had the idea of having him hold a bottle of water. I went looking for a shot I could borrow from, and I finally found what I was looking for in my photos from the Salvador, Bahia, Brazil trip, April 2007. Among those images I found some shots of Wellington at the beach holding a bottle of water, and I was able to grab that from the original photo and drop it into the photo of Nohea. With a little scaling and tilting, I was able to get it looking fairly natural – certainly workable for my purposes. I also wanted him to be holding his towel in his

This is the source photo of Nohea. You can see where I've added the new arm and the reference photo of the hand holding the towel.

This is the source photo of Nohea. You can see where I've added the new arm and the photo of the hand holding the towel.

left hand, not his right, so I had to borrow a hand and towel from another shot of Nohea, and I just dropped that into the upper left-hand corner of the photo so I’d have a reference when I started painting. This is the kind of flexibility you have with digital photos, and it makes my job much easier.

As you can see from looking at the source photo, the original background was not too exciting. I wanted something that would lend itself to a tropical fantasy – the ocean, some tropical greenery, that sort of thing. So I went looking through my scenic shots for some tropical plants I could use. I have a fairly large library of digital photos I’ve shot over the years in and around Honolulu, shots of palm trees, tropical plants, anything I happen to spot that looks like it might come in handy for a future painting. I found what I was looking for from a series of shots I took one day while walking around Kahala, a neighborhood just over the hill from where I live. These leaves had just the shape and feeling I wanted for the painting.

    I found source material for the tropical greenery among my files of reference photos I've shot over the years in and around Honolulu. This is on a side street in Kahala.

I found source material for the tropical greenery among my files of reference photos I've shot over the years in and around Honolulu. This is on a side street in Kahala.

The color acrylic sketch I used as a reference for the final painting.

The color acrylic sketch I used as a reference for the final painting.

My next step was to draw another sketch and add the sea and the foliage from the reference photo. As you can see, I didn’t copy the foliage exactly. Rather, I tailored it to the composition. It’s a matter of taking different leaves that have the angle and feeling you want, and mixing them with other leaves until you get what you want. The trick is making it look natural. That took awhile, but I finally got the plants to look more or less like I wanted them to; I will most likely totally rework them when I do the final painting, but I have a good beginning. Then I took the whole thing a step further by mixing up some colors and using acrylics to paint the sketch I’d done. This gave me a good solid color study I could use as a reference for the larger painting on canvas.

But there was another element I needed, something in the upper part of the image. I wanted some palm-tree fronds, but I didn’t know exactly what angle they should be, or how many, or what size…I could have done another sketch, or painted on top of the acrylic sketch I’d just done, but I didn’t know exactly what I wanted and I wanted to be able to try different things, so I decided to do it on the computer, using Photoshop. I scanned the sketch and opened it in Photoshop, and using my digital tablet, started drawing palm fronds on the image. As I’d expected, it took several tries before I got close to what I wanted. In a case like this, it’s wonderful being able to hit undo on the computer and

I was able to try out different palm fronds digitally before deciding this was about what I wanted.

I was able to try out different palm fronds digitally before deciding this was about what I wanted.

try something else. In this way I was able to approximate the look I wanted for the palm fronds.They weren’t exactly what I wanted, but they were close enough I was pretty sure I’d be able to make them work in the final painting.

The finished acrylic painting: "Tropical Adventure"

The finished acrylic painting: "Tropical Adventure"

Finally I was able to begin the final stage of this adventure. I used my digital projector to transfer my final color study to canvas, then began painting. I won’t say it proceeded without a hitch, but all the preparation I’d done paid off, and it was mostly just a matter of doing the actual painting. This took about 3 days and many, many hours, but it would have taken much longer if I hadn’t done all the preparation I did! I won’t go into all the details of this final stage, but if you look carefully you’ll see lots of little touches have been added to bring the painting to life – things like highlights in the hair, a subtle lightening along the top edges of the palm fronds as if the sun is striking them from above, reflected bluish light along some edges of the body, the gradation of the sea from dark blue at the horizon to turquoise in the lower areas – and many more details you can spot if you look closely. Of course, for me the thing that makes this painting work more than any other single element is the face. There’s a presence there. When I look into his eyes, he looks back at me. Without that, the painting wouldn’t work. With it, there’s a bit of magic there. I worked hard on this painting, but I also got lucky that the total is more than the sum of the parts, and there is a person there. I got what I was aiming for – a gorgeous tropical fantasy!

Sam and Kawai wrestling, and the sketch ("Temporary Victory") that came from it

Sam and Kawai wrestling, and the sketch ("Temporary Victory") that came from it

For Valentine’s Day this year I decided to do a whole new series of rough sketches of couples. One reason for that is that I have so many great shots of Kawai and Sam that I haven’t drawn yet. Another reason is, I knew it would be a challenge. Drawing couples is more than twice as hard as drawing a single figure…

…because of the relationships. Drawing is all about relationships, you know. I’m talking about how different parts of the image fit together. Everything depends on the relative position of the line you’re drawing. When you’re drawing a single figure, you get used to knowing where the hands are going to fall relative to the arm and the rest of the body, for instance. You get used to drawing a body in many different positions. All you have to concern yourself with is one body and you know about where everything is going to end up.

xxxxxxxxxxx

Here's a sketch where it's vital to get relative positions of hands, arms, legs, etc. absolutely accurate.

But when you have two figures, things suddenly get a lot more complicated. First of all, you have twice as many figures to concern yourself with. That’s not so bad, because you still know basically where each figure’s hands, feet, head, etc. are going to go. But wait a minute! Where are Sam’s hands relative to Kawai? Is Kawai’s shoulder higher up than Sam’s shoulder? Is Sam’s left foot really that far away from Kawai’s right foot? If you’re not careful, you can begin a nice drawing of two boys standing and holding hands, and then halfway through realize that those hands can’t reach each other! Soon after I began working on this couples series, something interesting started to happen. Let me see if I can explain this. It has to do with the difference between how I hold a pencil and how I hold a brush. When I draw, I usually grasp the pencil fairly low, close to its point, and rest the heel of my hand on the paper for support (this is how most of us use a pen or pencil for writing). This gives one a great deal of control over one’s line. When I paint, I tend to hold the brush farther up, and with a grip more like I would use if I picked up a stick and wanted to whack something with it. You have less control over your line this way, but if you want big, loose movements, this is a much better technique.

Here's a good example of the rawer, more 'honest' line I'm talking about. Probably a subtle difference to anybody but me--but it's there.

Here's a good example of the rawer, more 'honest' line I'm talking about. Probably a subtle difference to anybody but me--but it's there.

The interesting thing that started to happen is this: I found myself holding the pencil as if it were a brush, and drawing almost as if I were painting. I was no longer resting the heel of my hand on the paper, which meant I had less control. But I had more freedom. This was scary and exhilarating. I don’t know why it occurred to me to do this; it happened spontaneously. But with staying loose and being more free one of the major themes of my life, and with my always aiming at loosening up more and more, it’s not too surprising when this kind of thing happens. But it was still exciting! And the quality of my line changed. It became more raw, less controlled and less calculated. For some reason I found this new, rougher line more beautiful. Perhaps because it was less controlled, it seemed to me more honest.

I call this 'Rock Lobsters.'

I call this 'Rock Lobsters.'

This was a breakthrough drawing for me. The more I experimented with this new approach, the more fun I started having. I got bolder (always a good thing!). I decided to see what would happen if I also used this approach with colored pencils. The sketch you see here is the first one where I really let go with this approach. You can see the overall look is quite different. Up close the lines look crazy and out of control; but when you pull back, you can see everything works together to create an image. And because of the agitated, energetic quality of the line, it has more energy and life than a very careful, controlled series of lines would have. I like a controlled line sometimes–it can be very beautiful–but for me, now, at this point in my life, if I can be a channel for beauty that is less controlled and more influenced by ‘chance,’ that makes me feel more alive, and much happier.

Another example of the new spontaneity I'm able to get sometimes with my sketches.

Another example of the new spontaneity I'm able to get sometimes with my sketches.

For the remainder of the time I spent working on the couples series (I completed 34 sketches in a period of a couple of weeks!), I used the technique I’ve described, approaching drawing more as if it were painting. If you look at the series as a whole (S1090115 through S1090227), you can see I went back and forth between the more controlled and the more spontaneous approaches, but overall I stayed much looser, and I’m very happy with the results. From the response once the Valentine’s Day Showing went online, it seems you guys are, too!

jorge6303

Friday, January 16 was the day of the big storm. At least that’s what all the media here in Honolulu said: The island of Oahu will sustain gale-force winds and heavy rains, they said, and they closed the schools and lots of businesses in anticipation of the tempest. Meanwhile, I had scheduled a photo shoot with my new friend Antonio, who was vacationing from California and had exactly one day available to model for me, the last day of his stay here—Friday, January 16.

I awoke at 6am and called Antonio, who was staying at a hotel just a block away. It was still dark out, but was starting to rain, and chances for a decent photo shoot looked slim. But at 630 I picked him up at his hotel and we decided to take our chances. We headed for Diamond Head with our fingers crossed. When we hiked down the trail to the beach, it was looking pretty grey and cloudy. Antonio was sucking down coffee like he really needed it—only after the photo shoot was over did he tell me that he’d gotten less than an hour of sleep the night before…

As we walked down the beach to the spot where I usually like to set up, I surveyed the morning sky. Pretty cloudy, but surprisingly, not that bad. It certainly didn’t look like a huge storm was about to hit. But you never know, and these things can happen fast, so I hurried Antonio along so we could get started shooting before the weather went to hell.

jorge6329jorge6411

I started shooting Antonio in the grey light of dawn and while not ideal, I was getting some useable shots. Then, suddenly, while Antonio was running naked down the beach, the clouds parted, and the light of an intense sunrise shone through. I couldn’t believe our good luck.

Now Antonio and I really sprang into action. We didn’t know how long we would have this fabulous light–it could disappear at any moment—so I had Antonio running, jumping, somersaulting, diving into the ocean and running out again, basically wearing himself out—while I tried to keep up by snapping photos as fast as the camera would let me.

The light was a gift that could be taken away at any moment, so we took full advantage...

Looking good in that great morning light!

Amazingly, we continued shooting in this wonderful dawn light for two and a half hours, and no storm hit. I guess I must be living right, because the gods were really watching out for me that morning. I shot almost 2000 images of Antonio, and not only was the light great, Antonio was an exceptionally good model. He was relaxed and fun and had great energy right from the beginning, and as the photo shoot continued, he got even better.

There’s a certain kind of straight-boy street-kid attitude that I find really sexy (and I’ll bet I’m not the only one), and at one point in the shoot I asked Antonio if he could do that, and he fell right into it. He started walking toward me with his shorts falling down, sometimes even falling OFF, and giving me that Latin-boy I’m-gonna-fuck-you-up, or maybe it was I’m-gonna-fuck-you, attitude, but whatever you wanna call it, he totally nailed it. And me too! I had to take a few deep breaths to compose myself…!

This is one of those straight-boy attitude things that really stirs up my fantasies.

As I said, we were able to shoot for 2 and a half hours and the light stayed great. Partly because the weather was such a pleasant surprise, and partly because Antonio was so much fun and did such a great job, this was one of the best and most fun photo shoots I’ve done in a long time.  I now have a wealth of beautiful images of Antonio and my plan is to release some of them as photographs before I even begin drawing from them. They’re so great I want to start sharing them immediately.

It was a fun morning!

Update to this Entry:

In May 2012 I published an e-book called “Antonio” which contains over 60 uncensored photographs from the photo shoot discussed above. You can purchase it for instant download here.

One of the test shots I took of Tommy when we first met.

One of the test shots I took of Tommy when we first met.

A few weeks ago, before Christmas, I was introduced to Tommy by my friend Kawai. Tommy (who works as a dancer in Waikiki under the name Christian) is originally from Arizona, and has only lived in Hawaii a few months. I had seen him dancing on the dais at Hula’s from time to time and was definitely interested in meeting him. When he walked into my apartment for a preliminary meeting, I was struck by how tall and beautifully proportioned he is. Plus he has beautiful eyes, among other things. I knew I wanted to work with him but had to put it off until after Christmas because of my usual visit-the-family trip to Nebraska. Finally in mid-January 2009 I managed to find a time that worked for both Tommy and me.

On a weekday morning at sunrise (the better to avoid a populous beach), Tommy and I drove to an area near Diamond Head and hiked down a surfer trail to the beach. We were lucky; it was a nice sunrise and a nice morning. A few clouds, but still some great light.

Tommy getting ready for the shoot to begin.

Tommy getting ready for the shoot to begin.

Quiet, static poses to begin...

Quiet, static poses to begin...

I began with some calm, static poses, since both photographer and model needed to warm up. I was also stalling a bit, waiting for the sun to peek over the horizon so I would have that magic light.

As soon as the sunlight began to strike the beach, I had Tommy begin moving. The first thing I had him do was run up and down the beach. (One of the things I’ve realized about myself as a photographer recently is how much I like action shots. I mean, I knew this for a long time but only recently did I realize that not every photographer does this. I’m not much for carefully posed shots with an orchestrated backdrop. I’d rather just put the model into a situation and turn him loose and see what happens.)

The action began with Tommy running up and down the beach.

The action began with Tommy running up and down the beach.

After Tommy had done some running and gotten warmed up (and with his long, graceful legs and body, that made for some great shots) , I had him jump into the surf and get wet.  (Jumping into the ocean naked in the chilly air of dawn is a bit of a shock for a model, but not that much of a hardship when you compare Hawaii to much of the rest of the world…the water here is pretty warm even in January!)

Then, once he’d gotten wet, I had him come out of the water and begin rolling around on the beach while the surf alternately rolled in over him, creating beautiful splashing patterns, and receded, leaving him lying in the wet sand. (Seriously, one of my favorite things to photograph is a beautiful naked man rolling around in the surf in the golden light of dawn. I mean, how can you go wrong??)

tommy5791tommy5745tommy5762One of my favorite things to do with a model, especially an inexperienced model who is a bit unsure, is tell them to act like they’re totally drunk and stagger around for a bit before falling down, as drunkenly and awkwardly as possible. This often results in unusual, provocative images that somehow manage to be awkward and beautiful at the same time. These can be a total delight, and a real challenge, to draw. And every once in a while, you do get a magical image that works as a photograph as well as a potential drawing or painting. Just as importantly, though, it relaxes the model and that’s always a good thing.

tommy5727

As beautiful as the setting and the light were, Tommy’s body was their equal. He reminds me of a thoroughbred racehorse, with those long beautiful legs, and an elegance and grace that comes through no matter what.

tommy5942Of course the natural next set of poses after rolling around in the surf is grabbing a towel and drying off. I must have shot forty or fifty thousand shots of this in my career, but it’s always beautiful, and one reason for that is it’s such a natural thing. And in my book, there are fewer things sexier than a beautiful man drying off…

I shot Tommy in many other poses and settings in the area, and finally when the light started getting a bit flat and I was tired, I told him, Okay, we’re done! And of course as soon as I said that, he relaxed in a way he hadn’t been able to for the previous couple of hours. This almost always happens, especially with a less-experienced model. As soon as I tell him the shoot is over and you can dry off and get dressed, he stops trying to pose and look beautiful and just becomes himself. This is what happened with Tommy. At that moment I start shooting like crazy, before the model catches on that he’s still being photographed. In those few moments I often capture a side of the model that was not available up to that point.

tommy6222.jpgIt was a great photo shoot, but I think I only scratched the surface. Tommy has such a beautiful, elegant body, I think I only began to capture all that he has to offer visually. So I may have to do another shoot with him. Plus he will be more relaxed a second time, and that will make a big difference. In the meantime, though, I have a lot of beautiful images of him to work from. And the photographs themselves are so nice I may release some of them before I even begin drawing and painting from them.

tommy5993.jpg